Managing a Growing Project

I am no Project Manager in even the loosest sense of the word. Despite that I find myself learning more and more of the processes of PM. This is especially true when projects start to expand and grow. Specifically I am speaking about the NHL API project I started almost two years ago. This lead me to the rabbit hole that is permissions and how to manage the project overall going forward. The projects roots are very rough, even today I still generally commit directly to master. Now the repository has grown to over 70 commits, two distinct files and 17 contributors.

Balance

I am constantly trying to be cognizant of is becoming overly possessive of the project. While it may have started as a one-man show I want and enjoy contributions from others. The converse of worrying about becoming possessive is that there are times when steering is necessary. One of the instances that comes to mind is the suggestion of including example code. The goal of the project is documentation, so I declined such suggestions. Unmaintained code becomes a hindrance over time and I don’t want to add that complexity to the project.

Growth

There is often a pressure to grow projects, to make them expand over time and change. Its a common thing for businesses to always want growth and it seems that mentality has spread to software. Something like the NHL API is a very slow changing thing, just looking at the commit history shows this. Weeks and months will go by without new contributions or even me looking at the API itself. I dabbled with ideas such as using Swagger to generate more appealing documentation. Every time I tried to add something new and unique I realized it felt forced. This ultimately forced me to accept that growth will not be happening, the project has likely reached its zenith.

Looking Forward

The next steps are likely small quality-of-life things such as the recent Gitter.im badge. Things that make it easier for people to interact but don’t change the project overall. My knowledge of the API makes for fast answers so I try to help out when I am able.

Winter Improvements for Hockey-Info

Finally got around to a rather large update for this project, fixed some small bugs such as the L10 data being way wrong (was showing win-loss-ot for the entire seaseon) as well as added in missing stats for Goalies and made the display of previous game results more sensible. Also redid about 95% of the interface to use Bootstrap4 which has made the look more uniform throughout. If you are interested in seeing the code itself you can see that here, or if you just want to check out the live site which I host as well then you can head over to http://hockey-info.online.

Project: hockey-info

So I don’t always have great cell phone service, sometimes its weak 4G or even not 4G at all so modern designed apps suffer when bandwidth is a trickle at best. I would be away from home trying to find out whats going on with a Caps game and the NHL app would just be painfully slow or not work at all sometimes. Eventually I decided the only reasonable thing a hockey nerd such as myself could do was write something to fill this void, ideally something simple and effective to get me the information I wanted without a lot of overhead and frilly extra stuff I didn’t really care about.

The repos are still in high flux right now as I don’t even have a readme file yet for the main one, however this page can serve to sort of explain the bits and pieces.

nhlapi – This is what started it all for me really, I wanted more information about games (for an IRC bot) and threw myself into pulling various bits of information together about the NHL API in an easy to read and access way so others didn’t have to spend the hours I did looking for how to do things.

hockey-info – A super simple website written in Python utilizing the Flask framework. The focus is to be fast, simple and mobile friendly. It directly queries the NHL API for all its information and is formatted in a way that works well on mobile

hockey-info-docker – A bare bones Dockerfile to deploy the latest release of hockey-info. The container is based on Alpine and is as trimmed down as possible, makes deployment super simple and easy for anybody to run their own instance with only a few commands (provided you already have a Docker host to run it on).

Naturally I make no warranty about this app or any of the code I have written, its purely something neat I built in my spare time and am tossing out there for others to enjoy, modify and extend to their hearts content. If you do happen to have input, ideas, or feedback hit me up on twitter or just open an issue on Gitlab if its a purely technical issue to address with the code.

Hockey Records

The NHL was kind enough to release records.nhl.com to the public to browse more interesting stats than just game-by-game data, things like players that have hit the 1000 point milestone and other more trivia-friendly factoids.  Naturally the spidey senses went to tingling as soon as I saw the news on Reddit so I ran off to start poking at it and lo-and-behold it actually hits what appears to be the same data source as nhl.com/stats/rest but with all sorts of extra endpoints to try out.  This time around I attempted to be slightly clever and looked at https://records.nhl.com/static/js/client.bundle.js to save myself the trial-and-error process I used on a lot of the Stats API.  Turns out this was actually a smart move an probably would have let me document a lot of this stuff sooner if I had thought to spend some time poking around the code of the stats website.  No matter,  what counts is that now there is a rough outline of the Records API and it has been rolled into the NHLAPI repo on Gitlab.  Just like before if you see something I missed feel free to open a PR and if I don’t happen to see it right away @ me on twitter, I try to respond fairly quickly.

Footnote: https://beautifier.io/ is fantastic, it let me unmangle the client.bundle.js file so it was readable

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami